Man Alone: The Dark Book

(6 customer reviews)

$16.95

by Jack Remick

Man Alone is set in and around a complex Seattle where Rat City meets the Billionaires’ Club. Zene, a man alone, lives in a chaotic, sexually disruptive and violence-wrecked world. His life ruined after a chain of disappointments and falls-the fruits of his violent nature, Zene runs into Karizma, a love-creature from his past, and he’s smitten again, knowing all the while that for him, there’s no future in love. Not your basic romance, for sure.

Description

Praise for Man Alone

From its opening scene on a bar stool, to Zene’s denouement, walking into the tunnel of darkness, the novel beguiles the reader with images that arrest, unmask, and reflect Everyman’s fated existential dialogue with self. Man Alone’s stripped-down cadence—peeling away the veneer of words—achieves an apotheosis of carnal sensuality where two bodies combine into one . . . this author’s luminous reveal.
—Dennis Must, author of MacLeish Sq. et al

Jack Remick has invented a new genre—Pulp Literature. In Man Alone, Remick delivers lines with the deadpan of a pulp detective on the crime-trail . . . Remick’s characters engaged in the base pursuit of their own ends, burn up in the fire of their own kindling . . . Remick builds on a theory of masks and unmasking, and, in the stunningly poetic images that run in Zene’s observations, you see a writer as observer whose characters have depth as well as a fatal blind spot. In Man Alone Remick has come into some kind of new literary superpower.
—Christine Runyon, poet

Man Alone is a story that must be experienced . . . the story is wonderfully original, with characters who are exquisite in their flaws . . . Remick’s talent with words is unquestionable, and his ability to create such original tales that draw you in and force you to contemplate the realities of the darker side of human nature is, in my opinion, unmatched.
—Theresa Cogdill, artist

Man Alone is . . . rich in character, plot, and language. Remick’s characters are twisted, murderous, real—and above all, riveting.
—Jack Smith, author of Being and Run 

Jack Remick’s Man Alone, the dark story of a defeated man sliding into reckless hopelessness, packs a spare, yet intimate gut punch with unforgettable characters and an impeccable sense of place. Remick is a masterful storyteller. He is that good.
—Eleanor Parker Sapia 

Man Alone is Jack Remick at his best. He delivers a cautionary tale of forgotten love and lust wrapped up into a who done it complete with tarnished knight and a fallen princess. Every word and sentence are sharp with the right kind of hurt . . . Man Alone draws you in as you wait for the inevitable boy saves girl story. But the outcome will surprise you.
—Tony Ollivier, author of The Amsterdam Deception and The Tokyo Diversion 

In Man Alone, Remick’s doesn’t just tell you a story . . . he makes you experience it . . . observe it, feel the pain, the hurt, the ecstasy, the joy, the sadness of the cast of broken toys, that live in his story . . . This is a book that demands you sit up and pay attention . . . a story that will make you think, will cause others to say, there but for the grace of God, go I. My advice . . . Buy a ticket; you’re going to enjoy the ride. I did. 5 Stars!
—Wally Lane, Screenwriting to Industry Standard 

Man Alone is classic Jack Remick, a prolific writer who digs deep into the dark underbelly of modern civilization and takes readers to places we don’t always want to go. His characters are people we may not want to spend time with but who ask questions we need to address . . . With the skill of a master, Remick keeps us turning pages in a voyeuristic desire to see what happens next like drivers slowing to gawk at high-speed collisions.
—Arleen Williams, author of The 39th Victim and The Alki Trilogy 

Jack Remick explores the lonely, often violent experiences of a straight man in a cold world. Man Alone is a brutal look at what some men are willing to do in their search for connection and intimacy.
—Elena Hartwell, novelist, One Dead Two to Go; Three Strikes You’re Dead

Man Alone is dark, funny, vivid, and fast. The people are desperate and they are sexy and they are dangerous. Man Alone is about love and beauty and evil. The prose glints and dazzles, page after page. It doesn’t let up. It is brilliant. Read this book!
—Priscilla Long, author of Fire and Stone: Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?

Man Alone—a riveting existential story about a man’s love for a woman—is a treatise on frustrating passions, dreadful forebodings, disappearance, erasure, death, and silence. It is a compulsion about a man’s desire to do “anything to keep from hitting bottom alone.” Jack Remick pieces together a world, scene by scene, of broken souls and urban misfits longing to break free from their oppressors . . . In this twenty-first-century tale, Remick, a brilliant storyteller, embeds the good/evil of civilization as a theology of dread that “explained the state of the human in the universe.” We are left to ponder “a dead man killing another dead man” and the classical Greek word: tetelestai, meaning “It is complete.” The Man Alone—“the complete and utter finality of existence”—the silence. —Geri Gale, novelist, In The Closet

With Man Alone, Remick has created a striking study of primal man in the throes of desperation and loneliness. Every character is gravely flawed, yet manically interesting…Throughout the entire novel, Remick repeatedly recalls us to the nature of man as an animal whose existence is threatened when rejected, who fights, possesses, and dies for a mate as a matter of existential principle. His use of smell as the leading sense potently grounds us in the primitive mind. This is further emphasized by the animalistic nature of the sexual encounters, the stark and fearless language, stripped format and structure, and wild unanswered questions. Remick has gone rogue in this masterful tale of unanswered yearning. He has created a beautifully disturbing power struggle between man and woman that sears the memory.
—Nicole Disney, award-winning novelist, Dissonance in A Minor. Hers to Protect. The Clinch.

6 reviews for Man Alone: The Dark Book

  1. Arleen Williams

    Man Alone is classic Jack Remick – a prolific writer who digs deep into the dark underbelly of modern civilization and takes readers to places we don’t always want to go. His characters are people we may not want to spend time with but who ask questions we need to address. Man Alone is a story of human despair in a world where “[c]ivilization once locked the chains on evil. Laws punished men who let it out … The katagogic spiral spun down until the only goodness left in the race lay in the moment of conception when pure innocence had not yet been perverted by a single breath.” With the skill of a master, Remick keeps us turning pages in a voyeuristic desire to see what happens next like drivers slowing to gawk at high-speed collisions.

  2. Wally Lane

    In Man Alone, Jack Remick’s latest book, he doesn’t just tell you a story… he makes you experience it… observe it, feel the pain, the hurt, the ecstasy, the joy, the sadness, of the cast of broken toys, that live in his story. Zene, the Loser trapped in a dead end life. Karizma, the girl that barged back into his life, fifteen years after she ditched him on prom night… and who is now trying to escape an abusive marriage to a sadistic older man, Alfred. This is a book that demands you sit up and pay attention… a story that will make you think… will cause some to say… There but for the grace of God, go I…

  3. M. Anne Sweet

    In Man Alone, Remick’s poetic voice pulses forward with a magnetic, rhythmic beat, drawing one on page by page, inevitable and irreversible. The sights, tastes, smells of love, lust, sex, and blood are visceral. The reader is fully ensconced in Zene’s dark world, lying beside him, walking beside him, sweating the lust of his passion, moving ever forward from rejection and desire to blood and the end of hope. It carries a punch from beginning to end!

  4. Nancy Adair

    Step aside, technophiles, and observe the depth of human creativity. AI will never write anything this human, this original, this alive.

    Man Alone wrapped itself around my heart and took me deep into thoughts about life and love and need.

    The writing hooked me first—the insights, the metaphors, the poetry of prose. Sparing on words, deep on images I could see, smell, and taste.

    The main characters were down-and-outs—nobody I know—until I started to recognize them as people from my own life. People in need. People I didn’t or couldn’t help.

    Man Alone ponders the paradoxes of life. How an unexpected turn of fortune can lead you downhill to a fate not of your own choosing—though you were making choices all along the way.

    So, life dumped you here. What do you do now? The story arrives at an unexpected, exciting, and inevitable finale, after which you close the book and continue thinking.

  5. Nicole Disney

    With Man Alone, Remick has created a striking study of primal man in the throes of desperation and loneliness. Every character is gravely flawed, yet manically interesting.

    Zene embodies the dangerous nice guy whose overtures have gone unrewarded and decayed into murderous entitlement, resentment, and despondency. Karizma, both enslaved and empowered by her sexuality, is the burning heart who undresses the nature of the men around her. She sells her body to strangers with an appetite for pain and humiliation while refusing to make the same trade with her husband, Alfred, who seeks to control and spite her by withholding his wealth. She is a powerful commentary on black hyper-sexualization and the resulting cruelty.

    Alfred’s afflictions are base and cumulative, erupting through the cracks in his ego sexually, violently, longingly. Karizma’s rejection of him sparks self-loathing that he projects onto Karizma with his need to punish her, but mirrors in his secretary, Monica, who he asks to abuse and debase him.

    Throughout the entire novel, Remick repeatedly recalls us to the nature of man as an animal whose existence is threatened when rejected, who fights, possesses, and dies for a mate as a matter of existential principle. His use of smell as the leading sense potently grounds us in the primitive mind. This is further emphasized by the animalistic nature of the sexual encounters, the stark and fearless language, stripped format and structure, and wild unanswered questions.

    Remick has gone rogue in this masterful tale of unanswered yearning. He has created a beautifully disturbing power struggle between man and woman that sears the memory.

  6. Tony Ollivier

    Every word and sentence is sharp with the right kind of hurt.

    Man Alone is Jack Remick at his best. He delivers a cautionary tale of forgotten love and lust wrapped up into a who-done it complete with a tarnished knight and a fallen princess. Every word and sentence is sharp with the right kind of hurt.

    Remick creates an all too real world as Zene Morley commits suicide by bar stool and struggles with a lack of hope for anything further than the next drink. His prospects have dwindled and now he’s seemly waiting for the end.

    The counterpoint to Zene’s single-room occupancy life, is Alfred Von Stebbin, a narcissistic dentist who hates his beautiful wife Karizma as much or more than she hates him. Gradually, we see every player’s backstory in glorious black and white with the occasional splotch of lustful color.

    Man Alone draws you in as you wait for the inevitable boy saves girl story. But the outcome will surprise you.

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